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STATEMENT WITHDRAWAL – RE: WILLOWTON GROUP

Good day,

It has come to our attention that the statement made on 11 September 2019, in an email newsletter, was published prior to Risk ZA Corporate Sustainability (Pty) Ltd. obtained all the relevant facts and, as a result, may have been misleading.

Risk ZA Corporate Sustainability (Pty) Ltd. expresses its apologies to Willowton Group for the statement and hereby withdraws the statement made on 11 September 2019 in its entirety. Risk ZA Corporate Sustainability (Pty) Ltd. has been informed by Willowton Group that the incident is currently under investigation and the cause of the incident is presently unknown.

Further details relating to the incident can be obtained from Willowton Group directly.

Sincerely, 
Risk ZA Corporate Sustainability (Pty) Ltd.

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ISO 31000:2018 Risk Management – Accelerate Business Performance

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The World Economic Forum describes the current competitive business landscape in a word: disruptive. How well an organisation approaches risk management in a climate of volatility can affect its ability to make robust and informed strategic decisions and achieve its objectives.

Download our FREE GUIDE ISO 31000:2018 How do I get started? where we investigate the 8 Principles that set out the requirements for a risk management initiative.

Traditionally, risk management played a supporting role at board level. However, over the past decade, organisations have adopted the view that risk management must be embedded in the general management of an organisation, and fully integrated across an enterprise with functions such as finance, strategy, internal control, procurement, continuity planning, human resources, and compliance.

Voices of stakeholders have become louder in their demand for transparency and accountability in managing the impact of risk, and evaluating the ability of leadership to embrace opportunities. The use of technology and economic globalisation have made risks increasingly entwined, placing even more emphasis on sound risk management within any organisation.

To keep pace with a rapidly evolving world and future threats, the International Organization for Standardization published a revised version of its Risk Management Standard in February 2018. Essentially, ISO 31000:2018 reflects the evolution of risk management thinking from a separate ‘siloed’ activity to an integrated management function. The overarching strategy of the standard is to embed risk management best practices on a micro-level within organisations so as to manage threats that stand in the way of enterprises achieving their objectives, and create value by finding and exploiting opportunity. This should grab the attention of anyone looking to gain competitive advantage, improve operations, or reduce costs within their organisation.

ISO 31000:2018 - Five Things to Know

1. It is clear and concise

The standard delivers a clear and concise guide to help all organisations manage risks. Risk management concepts are simply explained, giving diverse organisations and people the ability to access the tools that can drive change in order to protect and create value. ISO 31000:2018 is supplemented by ISO Guide 73:2009, a vocabulary index used to support ISO 31000:2018, and ISO 31010:2009 that focuses on risk assessment concepts, processes and the selection of risk assessment techniques.  ISO 31000:2018 has been trimmed down to just 15 pages, and risk management principles reduced from 11 to 8, which streamlines the process for implementation.

2. It is easy to implement

All organisations make decisions that shape their future every day. ISO 31000:2018 provides guidance on how to manage uncertainty to meet objectives, and how to implement risk management to support strategic decision making. This promotes intelligent risk taking at all levels of a business. Risk management best practices promote critical thinking about the role of uncertainty in decision making, and encourage the identification, assessment, and treatment of uncertainty that can impact daily business activities. Small organisations with limited room for exposure to adverse internal and external risks now have the ability to access invaluable tools to create a tolerable risk environment and protect value.

3. It creates and protects value

Creating and protecting value is the central tenant of ISO 31000:2018. If processes are not adding value, they are simply adding costs. The standard helps enterprises improve performance by embedding risk management into all business decision-making processes and making risk-based thinking a daily activity.

4. It reinforces integration

Integration is mentioned throughout the standard. Here are a few examples:

  • Risk management should be part of the organisational purpose, governance, leadership and commitment, strategy, objectives and operations.
  • Properly designed and implemented, the risk management framework ensures that the risk management process is a part of all activities throughout the organisation.
  • The organisation should continually improve the suitability, adequacy and effectiveness of the risk management framework and the way the risk management process is integrated.
  • The risk management process should be an integral part of management and decision-making and should be integrated into the structure, operations and processes of the organisation.

5. It focuses on leadership

Support from top management is essential for successful implementation of the risk management framework and processes. Leadership support for risk management becoming a strategic planning and decision-making tool creates a risk aware culture at all levels of the organisation.

CONCLUSION

ISO 31000:2018 can help create and protect value for any organisation by providing a flexible framework. If individuals are given the tools to promote critical thinking on how uncertainty can impact meeting objectives then the organisation should see an increase in value from an integrated risk management framework.

Ready to get started?

Risk ZA is a leading provider of enterprise risk management training programmes, which aim to improve your business performance. Contact us on +27 (0) 31 569 5900, email info@riskza.com or visit www.riskza.com.

PLUS! Download our FREE GUIDE ISO 31000:2018 How do I get started? where we investigate the 8 Principles that set out the requirements for a risk management initiative.

For more information or guidance on which ISO standard(s) and services would best suit the needs of your organisation, please email Risk ZA at info@riskza.com or contact us on 0861 Risk ZA / +27 (0) 31 569 5900.

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ISO 14001:2015 – Internal Audits Drive Real Improvements

ISO 14001:2015 - Internal Audits Drive Real Improvements

Confronted with dramatic environmental challenges, plus a slew of regulatory requirements, many organisations have implemented environmental management systems (EMSs). An ISO 14001:2015 based EMS is the most popular, used to meet compliance obligations, monitor environmental policies and procedures, manage resources and control environmental harms.

ISO 14001:2015 is a systems-based management tool centering around the Plan-Do-Check-Act method, which drives continual improvement. The standard outlines in Clause 9.2 that internal audits at set intervals are necessary to support the theme of continual improvement underpinning the management system.

The purpose of internal audits is to ensure that the organisation’s environmental policies, objectives, compliance obligations and performance requirements are met and recorded, and that any corrective action is taken where necessary.

DOWNLOAD FREE GUIDE

Our FREE Downloadable Guide How To Conduct An Environmental Management Systems Audit explores more about the ISO 14001 Environmental Audit process. You can get hold of it by clicking the button below.

What to expect from an ISO 14001:2015 audit

A key point to emphasise is that the intended outcomes of ISO 14001:2015 have not changed. The EMS must:

  • Protect the environment.
  • Meet compliance obligations.
  • Enhance environmental performance.

ISO 14001:2015 does, however, have a number of new requirements that will change the focus of an audit, which include:

  • Context of the organisation
  • Leadership
  • Planning
  • Support
  • Documentation
  • Operations
  • Performance evaluation
  • Improvement

ISO 14001:2015 - Clause 9: Performance evaluation

Performance evaluation is about measuring and evaluating an EMS to establish whether it meets the organisation’s planned outcomes. Evaluation provides valuable information for continual improvement by:

  • Evaluating the EMS’s effectiveness.
  • Establishing whether requirements of the standard are being met.
  • Verifying whether compliance obligations have been met.
  • Reviewing the EMs’s suitability, adequacy, effectiveness and efficiency.
  • Demonstrating that planning has been properly implemented.
  • Assessing the performance of processes against outcomes.
  • Determining the need or opportunities for improvement.

Monitoring, measurement, analysis and evaluation

Monitoring in the sense of ISO 14001 means checking, reviewing, inspecting and observing  planned activities to ensure that they are occurring as intended. So, for example, if an operational control states that water quality will be inspected twice weekly, then this is a monitoring process. Monitoring and measurement :

  • Evaluates environmental performance;
  • Analyses root causes of problems;
  • Assesses compliance with compliance obligations;
  • Identifies areas for corrective action;
  • Improves performance and efficiency.

The Internal audit programme

Unlike an audit schedule or audit plan, an audit programme includes the full life-cycle of auditing. From the very decision to use audit as a tool through planning and initiating the audit, performing, reporting and follow-up, to improvement of the entire programme and its constituent parts.

All parts of the EMS should be audited at minimum yearly, this is typically dealt with in an annual audit schedule. The entire EMS can be audited at once or in parts for more frequent audits. To establish the frequency of EMS audits, consider:

  • The nature of your operations;
  • Risks and opportunities;
  • Statutory and regulatory requirements and compliance obligations;
  • Significant environmental aspects / impacts;
  • Results of your monitoring programme;
  • Results of previous audits.

There are two principle considerations when auditing:

Compliance/conformance audits – ensure that management arrangements, like procedures, are being followed in order to comply with the requirements of ISO 14001.

Performance Audits –  ensure that the outputs of the management arrangements are achieving their intended outcomes. For example, the results of engineering controls applied to mitigate air pollution are achieving the legal limits.

ISO 14001 demands an approach that combines both a compliance/conformance and a performance approach to auditing.

Who should perform an environmental audit?

ISO 19011:2018 – Guidelines for auditing management systems – contains information on how to choose an Environmental Auditor. Environmental Auditors should have personal attributes, such as ethics, open-mindedness, perceptiveness and tact. They should understand audit principles, procedures and techniques, and have gained experience by conducting audits. They should know the subject matter they are auditing against and how this applies to different organisations.

Audit Team Leaders should be able to plan and resource effectively, have good communication and leadership skills. Environmental Auditors should complete training and have attained an appropriate level of education. When seeking an External Auditor consider the skills outlined here.

Auditor qualifications

All auditors need to receive initial and ongoing training. EMS auditors should be trained in auditing techniques and management system concepts, environmental regulations, and facility operations. For performance audits, an auditor needs to have a good understanding of the standard and the EMS, and a broad understanding of environmental issues. Auditors should be reasonably independent of the area or activity that is being audited and can definitely not audit their own work.

An effective audit programme should:

  • Develop audit procedures and protocols.
  • Establish an appropriate audit frequency.
  • Train auditors.  
  • Maintain audit records.
  • Link audit results to the corrective action system.

NEW! ISO 19011:2018: Guidelines for auditing management systems

Auditors are the ears and eyes of top management because they can provide an independent appraisal of an organisation’s operations and activities. In addition, a skillful auditor will add value to a management system by finding opportunities for improvement. It’s important to note that ISO 19011:2018 has significantly raises the bar on what constitutes essential competencies that management-systems auditors need to possess or acquire.

Revisions to ISO 9001:2015 (QMS), ISO 14001:2015 (EMS), and ISO 45001:2018 (OH&S) are all based on Annex SL of ISO Directive 1, the ISO High Level Structure. Consequently, ISO 19011 includes an annex to deal with how to audit organisational context, leadership and commitment, compliance and the supply chain, amongst others. The new standard will help with the effective audit of these management systems and facilitate a uniform approach to the auditing process where multiple systems are in place.

DOWNLOAD FREE GUIDE

Our FREE Downloadable Guide How To Conduct An Environmental Management Systems Audit explores more about the ISO 14001 Environmental Audit process. You can get hold of it by clicking the button below.

For more information or guidance on which ISO standard(s) and services would best suit the needs of your organisation, please email Risk ZA at info@riskza.com or contact us on 0861 Risk ZA / +27 (0) 31 569 5900.

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Deadly Listeria outbreak: Can ISO 22000 and preventative controls improve food safety?

Deadly Listeria outbreak: Can ISO 22000 and preventative controls improve food safety?

Calls for tougher food industry standards after deadly listeria outbreak - can ISO standards and preventative controls improve food safety?

Tiger Brands’ CEO Lawrence MacDougall announced in a press statement shortly after  Enterprise Polony was withdrawn from supermarket shelves, that tougher food safety standards are needed not only in South Africa but worldwide.

Food product recalls are at an all time high, which may or may not be good news.

Improvements in pathogen and risk detection technology and better regulatory oversight go some way to explaining the increase in recalls. But in the United States, undeclared allergens in foods topped the list as the major reason for food recalls.

Bacterial contamination – Salmonella and Listeria Monocytogenes – as well as undeclared substances and extraneous material found in foods also featured high in the April food recall report released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service (ERS).

Fresh produce, meat, seafood and poultry pose the greatest health risks.

The U.S. Agriculture Department has placed fresh produce, meat, poultry, and seafood on its ‘watch list’, as these foods pose the greatest potential health risk and are the cause of most foodborne illnesses, hospitalisations, and deaths.

Six people in Europe died in March from eating frozen corn contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, and consumers were warned to avoid eating romaine lettuce after an E.coli outbreak in 13 U.S.states and Canada was traced to Canadian grown lettuce.

Listeria outbreak in South Africa

The World Health Organisation (WHO) announced in April 2018 that the world’s worst Listeria outbreak was showing a downward trend in South Africa but it expected more cases.

Laboratory results revealed that in most cases people had become ill after eating polony containing strains of Listeria belonging to L. monocytogenes Sequence Type 6 (ST6).

Tiger Brands’ own laboratory tests confirmed this finding.

A total of 1,024 cases and 200 deaths from all provinces across the country were reported by the National Department of Communicable Diseases in May 2018.

But the death toll could be much higher as importers of Enterprise and RCL Foods products in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region‚ do not have the testing and monitoring facilities to detect listeriosis cases.

Listeria was also found at RCL Foods’ (Rainbow Chickens) Wolwehoek factory in Sasolberg.

The WHO believes that the number of people infected could indicate more than one source of the outbreak.

Listeria outbreak is a disaster for the entire ready-to-eat meat industry.

At the peak of the Listeriosis outbreak 80 tons of recalled polony were being destroyed daily.

Enterprise shut down its Polokwane and Germiston facilities ceasing supply to trade while it explored the source of the outbreak and did a deep cleaning process.

Tiger Brands and RCL Foods share prices tumbled on the JSE, and Alec Abraham, a senior equity analyst at Johannesburg-based Sasfin, said that the weakening of the share prices  would likely be sustained.

More than six countries imposed trade bans on products from South Africa, resulting in losses of over R100m in sausage exports alone.  

The outbreak has caused around R1 billion in losses to the pork value chain so far due to the changes in consumer perceptions of pork. Half of the pork industries meat is used in processed products, according to the South African Pork Producers’ Organisation.

“The pork industry suffered a severe blow following the recent outbreak of listeriosis,” said Paul Makube, senior agricultural economist at FNB Agri-Business.

Tiger Brands’ CEO Lawrence MacDougall said, “We are making every effort to ascertain how ST6 arrived in our production facility in Polokwane, despite us adhering to all the prevailing industry standards.The Listeriosis outbreak has been a terrible blight on the entire ready-to-eat meat industry. It is imperative for the entire industry to come together to agree on an appropriate standard with government. It is not a problem which is unique to South Africa or for that matter Enterprise Foods.”

The Democratic Alliance (DA) blamed Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi for a ‘lack of political will and clarity’ for not getting to the bottom of the Listeriosis outbreak sooner, and that the outbreak pointed to, ‘a broader neglect of proper food safety mechanisms on the part of government.’

DA member of parliament Evelyn Wilson said the record of the world’s largest listeriosis outbreak was ‘not one to be proud of’ and blamed it on a shortage of environmental health inspectors, saying the outbreak could have been avoided if factories were inspected every three months.

In the midst of the crisis and finger-pointing, the Department of Health announced that it would help victims of the Listeria outbreak seek legal restitution, and a class action has been filed by human rights attorney Richard Spoor and Bill Marler of U.S. food safety law firm Marler Clark.

Marler has represented thousands of people in claims against food companies and has harsh words for food and beverage producers.

“If you cannot make mass produced produce safely – don’t sell it. If you put a defective product into commerce and you harm someone, you are responsible. To suggest otherwise, is legally and morally wrong.” – Bill Marler

Estimates are that the listeria outbreak could end up costing Tiger Brand’s in excess of R800m.

Can ISO Management System Standards and preventative controls improve food and beverage safety?

In short, yes. If food and beverage producers pay attention to the big picture and improve food safety through the entire supply chain, food will become safer.

ISO standards and preventative controls encourage food companies to adopt comprehensive monitoring during every step of the food production process.

Risk assessments create higher food safety awareness among producers and food handlers. Increasing food safety awareness also increases people’s awareness of food quality,  as the two go hand in hand.

Food safety and quality management systems provide the framework for record-keeping, training hazard analysis (food safety), prerequisite programs, and so on, which are required in the mandatory preventive controls rules.

Software applications eliminate or reduce paperwork and actively manage food safety and quality by tracking data, which makes analysis easier and, therefore, the management of food safety and quality more efficient.

The ISO 22000 family of International Standards addresses Food Safety management.

ISO 22000 is a certifiable standard and sets out the requirements of a Food Safety management system. Everyone in the food supply chain from farmers and manufacturers to retailers and consumers, can benefit from the guidelines and best practice contained in these ISO standards, which cover everything from food harvesting to product packaging.

The internationally agreed standards help food producers meet legal and regulatory requirements for food products that cross national boundaries.

Issues relevant to consumers such as food safety, nutritional labelling, hygiene, and food additives are also addressed by these standards, which give consumers the peace of mind in knowing that the food they eat meets high standards for safety and quality and contains what it says on the label.

What should food and beverage producers do?

In view of the massive financial losses and reputational damage facing food giant Tiger Brands and the RTE value chain, can any food producer, retailer or anyone involved in the food chain afford not to implement food safety standards or at the very least re-examine Food Safety Management Systems across their entire operation?

Risk ZA offers training courses and consulting services in Food Safety, Quality Management and Risk Assessments for companies that wish to implement or improve on their Food Safety Management practices.

Visit our training course schedule for course details and booking information.

For more information or guidance on which ISO standard(s) and services would best suit the needs of your organisation, please email RISK ZA at: info@riskza.com or contact us on: 0861 Risk ZA / +27 (0) 31 569 5900.

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